Category Archives: Conscience

…conclusion: the high dream of conscience…

“Conscience is the inner voice that warns us somebody may be looking.”–Henry Louis Mencken

It would be foolish to assume that conscience can do its job — without its FIRST being the voice of a high dream.

In coaching, a high dream is “alert awareness” recognizing itself.  A high dream IS our capacity to stand in the present and recognize what we want in the current moment … because it arises from who we know ourselves to be.  We select what we perceive based on our desire for self-recognition.

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…conscience as a desire for confirmation…

“Did you forget that men prefer peace and even death to having to choose between good and evil?”  –  from the play, The Grand Inquisitor

The “2% truth” holds that every opinion we have possesses 2% of the truth.  No one is completely wrong – OR – completely right.  A full 98% is un-determinable except by consensus.  And not that “consensus” gets it right.  Consensus merely reflects the popularity of the opinion.  “A lie told long enough becomes the truth.”  This cynical adage illustrates both our need for consensus and the difficulty we have in obtaining one.  Coordinated response is impossible with too much disparity.  Yet, we are often at a loss when trying to confirm either our opinion or the opinion of others.

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…conscience as life loving life…

“Sacrifice still exists everywhere, and everywhere the elect of each generation suffers for the salvation of the rest.” – Henri Frederic Amiel

Theater is full of dramas that exalt “sacrifice” as love.  These dramas make the statement that any change is intolerable:

  • If balance – once experienced – cannot be restored,
  • If love – given freely – cannot survive, OR
  • If one’s relational boundaries – as originally experienced – cannot be justly maintained.

And, of course, sacrifice is then both honorable and inevitable.  Self-identification requires it.  We cannot stand apart from the love which grounds us to meaning and purpose.

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…conscience as a landslide…

“And I saw my reflection in the snow-covered hills / ‘Till Landslide brought me down.” – Stevie Nicks from the song Landslide

I went to visit my 83-year old mother yesterday.  She struggles with Parkinson’s, a disease the makes everything harder.

And during our afternoon banter, she asks me:  “Do you remember what the 5-year old boy says to his mother when asked to recite the golden rule? —  “Do it to others before they do it to you.”

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…conscience as trust’s intangible possession…

“Man stands in his own shadow and wonders why it’s dark.” – a Zen saying

Developmental shifts happen all the time. And they are very hard to spot.

In my last blog (…conscience as necessary forgiveness…), I described the developmental shift that happens when the intangible is more highly valued than the tangible.  Necessary forgiveness re-establishes trust.  Trust and forgiveness are what we give ourselves once we accept the intangible – both as an expectation and as an agreement. There is more than “heaven and earth” here – if we can learn to see it.

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…conscience as the folly of self-determination…

“Being smart about life leads us down a  superior but narrow road of self-deception.” — Thomas Moore

I bet you missed  it.

This year’s Oscar-award winning animated short, “The Lost Thing” by Shaun Tan, is a marvelously envisioned parable of redemption.  I recommend it.

During his acceptance speech, Tan said “Our film is about a creature that nobody pays any attention to, so this is wonderfully ironic.”  How true … the irony of misplaced redemption.

Misplaced you ask?   How can redemption be misplaced?  Well, in exactly the same way that self-determination can misplace one’s conscience.  We sometimes forget where we put it.   We need to be reminded that it’s right HERE … inside us … all the time.

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…conscience and the horsemen of the disappointed dream…

“That which we persist in doing becomes easier, not that the task itself has become easier, but that our ability to perform it has improved.” – Emerson

Whether we realize it or not, we carry a future orientation, a continuing belief in something more … something more for us and for the world we live in … and along with that belief comes disappointment.

Our ability to be conscientious … to do the right thing, to hold a sense of integrity about our actions and decisions … that capacity doesn’t include disappointment does it?  Disappointment is supposed to come afterward … after we are done, learning, committing and doing, right?  After we have exercised conscientious action … well, maybe not …

I don’t like being disappointed any more than you do!

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